People Say It’s Boring to Talk About a Dream You Had. Here’s Why You Should Do It Anyway

When Shane McCorristine, a scholar of modern British history, went trawling through police reports from 19th-century England, he was struck by the number that contained descriptions of dreams: witnesses and victims seemed to make a point of telling police and coroners if they had anticipated a crime or a death in their dreams. Telling dreams, he said, was a way to create “a social bond between a vulnerable person and the authorities.” But he noticed that dream reports started dropping out of inquests and news stories in the 1920s, and he pinned the blame on Freud. “Freudian theories were spreading, and they were recalibrating people’s relationship with the dream world,” he said. “There’s increasing embarrassment around dreams.” Suddenly, they might be interpreted as signs of some latent neurosis or sexual deviance.

began a review of Insomniac Dreams — a book about Nabokov’s relationship with his dreams — by apologizing for the topic: “Dreams are boring. On the list of tedious conversation topics, they fall somewhere between the five-day forecast and golf.” A few years earlier, radio producer Sarah Koenig devoted an episode of This American Life to laying out the seven topics that interesting people should never talk about. Dreams came in at number four, right behind menstruation. In the Guardian, British writer Charlie Brooker claimed that listening to other people’s dreams made him dream “of a future in which the anecdote has finished and their face has stopped talking and their body’s gone away.” Novelist Michael Chabon wrote in the New York Review of Books that discussion of dreams is all but banned from his breakfast table, railing against them as poor conversational fodder: They drag on and on. They get twisted in the telling. Most unforgivable, they are bad stories. When I explain the topic of my book, people frequently offer their sympathies: “People must want to tell you their dreams,” they say with an I-feel-your-pain nod. “Those are the most boring conversations.”” data-reactid=”12″>A century later, conventional wisdom dictates that dreams are not a subject for polite conversation. Writing for the New Yorker’s website in 2018, Dan Piepenbring began a review of Insomniac Dreams — a book about Nabokov’s relationship with his dreams — by apologizing for the topic: “Dreams are boring. On the list of tedious conversation topics, they fall somewhere between the five-day forecast and golf.” A few years earlier, radio producer Sarah Koenig devoted an episode of This American Life to laying out the seven topics that interesting people should never talk about. Dreams came in at number four, right behind menstruation. In the Guardian, British writer Charlie Brooker claimed that listening to other people’s dreams made him dream “of a future in which the anecdote has finished and their face has stopped talking and their body’s gone away.” Novelist Michael Chabon wrote in the New York Review of Books that discussion of dreams is all but banned from his breakfast table, railing against them as poor conversational fodder: They drag on and on. They get twisted in the telling. Most unforgivable, they are bad stories. When I explain the topic of my book, people frequently offer their sympathies: “People must want to tell you their dreams,” they say with an I-feel-your-pain nod. “Those are the most boring conversations.”

In a society that still sees dreams as frivolous, airing them aloud is considered pointless at best, self-indulgent at worst. People worry that in sharing their dreams, they could inadvertently reveal some shameful neurosis or deviant desire; one of Freud’s most enduring — yet least supported — theories is that most dreams express unconscious erotic wishes. If someone says, “You were in my dream last night,” it’s still basically an innuendo.

“Tellers of dreams have some basic obstacles to overcome,” literary scholar James Phelan said when I asked him whether there was anything about dreams that rendered them tedious narratives. “What makes stories of non-dream experiences interesting is that they are ‘tellable’ in some sense: the story implicitly claims that there’s some- thing about the experiences that raise them above the level of ordinary, unremarkable happenings.” The protagonist might confront some danger, learn a lesson, or encounter something beautiful. But in dreams, “just about any event can occur, which means that the ordinary/extraordinary distinction relevant to stories of non-dream experiences no longer applies, which makes tellability more murky.”

Another problem is that dreams don’t follow the type of logic we expect of a good yarn, Phelan said. “Often tellers will try to recount faithfully the sequence of the dream events. But such faithfulness typically means no cause-and-effect logic, and that absence typically means no coherence to the story, and no coherence means a bad story. If the story of my day is boring because it is awash in details of no significance, the faithful recounting of a dream is boring because it is awash in randomness.”

And it’s hard to feel invested in another person’s dream. You don’t have any stake in it — you know from the outset that the story ends with the dreamer waking up in bed, unscathed. “The teller of the dream has a listener who inherently doesn’t really care, because it’s the teller’s dream, and the listener is hearing something kind of egotistical and likely to be embarrassing,” said Alison Booth, an English professor at the University of Virginia who specializes in narrative theory. “How are we to imagine we are the dreamer, when we hear about it? Whereas in fiction, rule number one is you are the reader and you have every right to be at the center of the story/imagine yourself as protagonist.”

As our ancestors intuited, talking about dreams — whether casually recounting them to friends, analyzing them in structured groups, or even sharing them with strangers on the internet — can amplify their benefits. The more we integrate our dreams into our days, the more easily we remember them. And the act of discussing dreams can bring people together; just as dreams open up conversations on sensitive or embarrassing issues in a therapeutic setting, they can also facilitate intimate conversations among friends.

From the 1970s onward, psychiatrist and psychoanalyst Montague Ullman led the movement to develop dream-sharing groups. He wanted to democratize dream analysis — to find a way for people without special qualifications or access to psychiatric care to gain insight and social connection from their dreams. “Trust, communion, and a sense of solidarity develop rapidly in a dream-sharing group,” he wrote. “There is an interweaving of lives at so profound a level that the feeling of interconnectedness becomes a palpable reality.”

study, college students’ levels of personal insight were measured after they shared either a dream or a significant real-life experience with the researchers. The students met in groups until everyone had spent a full forty-five-minute session parsing both a dream and an emotional daytime event. Sharing a dream proved to be more helpful; scores on scales of exploration insight (“I learned more from the session about how past events influence my present behavior”; “I learned more about issues in my waking life from working with the dream/event”; “I learned things that I would not have thought of on my own”) and personal insight (“I got ideas during the session for how to change some aspect(s) of myself or my life”; “I learned a new way of thinking about myself and my problems”) were significantly higher if the students had worked with a dream.” data-reactid=”22″>New research confirms what Ullman suspected: participating in a dream group can yield a host of social and psychological benefits. In one study, college students’ levels of personal insight were measured after they shared either a dream or a significant real-life experience with the researchers. The students met in groups until everyone had spent a full forty-five-minute session parsing both a dream and an emotional daytime event. Sharing a dream proved to be more helpful; scores on scales of exploration insight (“I learned more from the session about how past events influence my present behavior”; “I learned more about issues in my waking life from working with the dream/event”; “I learned things that I would not have thought of on my own”) and personal insight (“I got ideas during the session for how to change some aspect(s) of myself or my life”; “I learned a new way of thinking about myself and my problems”) were significantly higher if the students had worked with a dream.

one experiment, she and a coauthor recruited 34 women going through a divorce and invited 22 of them to a weekly dream group. Many of their dreams revolved around painful themes like failing or being thwarted or mocked. One woman dreamed of going home to reconcile with her husband and finding him in bed with two beautiful women in an apartment full of dead fish. Another woman dreamed of climbing a rope up a muddy hill, only to keep sliding back down. The 12-person control group, meanwhile, spent the two-month period of the study on a waitlist before finally sharing their dreams in a single workshop. By the end of the experiment, the women who had participated in the ongoing dream group not only had gained insight into their dreams but also ranked higher on measures of overall self-esteem. The catharsis of sharing their secrets and the pleasure of belonging to a community translated into a confidence that stretched beyond the limits of the weekly dream group.” data-reactid=”23″>Clara Hill, a psychologist at the University of Maryland, has studied how dream groups can help people improve a relationship or cope with a breakup. In one experiment, she and a coauthor recruited 34 women going through a divorce and invited 22 of them to a weekly dream group. Many of their dreams revolved around painful themes like failing or being thwarted or mocked. One woman dreamed of going home to reconcile with her husband and finding him in bed with two beautiful women in an apartment full of dead fish. Another woman dreamed of climbing a rope up a muddy hill, only to keep sliding back down. The 12-person control group, meanwhile, spent the two-month period of the study on a waitlist before finally sharing their dreams in a single workshop. By the end of the experiment, the women who had participated in the ongoing dream group not only had gained insight into their dreams but also ranked higher on measures of overall self-esteem. The catharsis of sharing their secrets and the pleasure of belonging to a community translated into a confidence that stretched beyond the limits of the weekly dream group.

“The interpersonal dimension of interpreting dreams in Auschwitz was connected with the inmates’ need for capturing others’ attention,” Owczarski wrote. “When a prisoner shared an interesting dream, he or she became, at least for a while, important for his or her interlocutor . . . The meaning of a dream was not as important as the sheer fact of talking about it. Sharing dreams was therefore a kind of mutual help, aimed at increasing the inmates’ self-esteem.”

After liberation, many of the inmates were embarrassed to remember their one-time faith in dreams; the extreme stress of camp life had allowed them to suspend their disbelief. “It is hard to tell why we were all so naïve,” one survivor wrote. “Nowadays, we see them [the dream interpretations] as immature or even silly, but back then they were simply necessary,” said another.

Why We Dream: The Transformative Power of Our Nightly Journey by Alice Robb, on sale Nov. 20. Copyright © 2018 by Alice Robb. Published and reprinted by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.” data-reactid=”35″>Adapted from Why We Dream: The Transformative Power of Our Nightly Journey by Alice Robb, on sale Nov. 20. Copyright © 2018 by Alice Robb. Published and reprinted by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.

Does Maniac Really Need So Many Dream Sequences?

The new Netflix original series Maniac stars Emma Stone and Jonah Hill as two dysfunctional loners who take part in a dystopian pharmaceutical trial. Fantasy author Chandler Klang Smith felt the last episode was weak, but otherwise she loved the show.

“The first nine episodes are my favorite TV drama of all time,” Smith says in Episode 335 of the Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast. “And I would say that even including Episode 10, it’s definitely in my top five.”

The show leans heavily on dream sequences, which range from a Kubrick-inspired first contact scenario to an ultra-violent gangster showdown. That variety of characters and settings strongly appealed to science fiction author Rajan Khanna. “I’m always a sucker for alternate realities, and so it kind of fits into that vein for me,” he says. “The weirder the show was, the more I appreciated it.”

But Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy host David Barr Kirtley thought that some of the dream sequences felt out of place.

“The show kind of lost me with Episode 4, where there’s this—it’s sort of like Fargo or something—this lemur kidnapping adventure with gangsters,” he says. “It felt very disconnected from the rest of the story up to that point, and I felt like it just wasn’t as interesting to me as the more science fictional, conspiracy stuff that had come before.”

Science fiction author Matthew Kressel usually dislikes dream sequences, but found that Maniac ultimately won him over.

“Not all of the dreams worked narratively for me, but I really liked that the show was not afraid to use that to tell a story,” he says. “As I was watching it I was sort of iffy on it, but in retrospect, thinking about it now, I really enjoyed it.”

Listen to the complete interview with Chandler Klang Smith, Rajan Khanna, and Matthew Kressel in Episode 335 of the Geek’s Guide to the Galaxy podcast (above). And check out some highlights from the discussion below.

Chandler Klang Smith on Patrick Somerville:

“I was actually familiar with the writer, Patrick Somerville, who’s the creator of the show, because I reviewed his book The Universe in Miniature in Miniature for the KGB Bar lit mag, back probably the better part of a decade ago, and that book just made a real impression on me. In that book there’s the ‘Device for Understanding Other People,’ I think it’s called, which in some ways is similar to the technology that’s explored in this show—the idea of a machine or computer that can help you access another person’s consciousness. I just thought that that was a really elegant, moving, memorable work. … It’s definitely a book that’s worth checking out if you enjoyed Maniac.”

Matthew Kressel on mental illness:

“I was afraid that they were going to handle mental illness in a bad way. So for example, in Silver Linings Playbook—and I thought most of that film actually handled mental illness really well—but I thought that they destroyed their own setup by basically having the characters live happily ever after at the end. The message of the movie—at least that I took from it, maybe others didn’t—was that all you need is a companion who loves you, and that you love, and then everything will be fine. … And having people in my life who have suffered through mental illness, I know that’s not the case. You could love someone to death, and they just have bad brain chemistry. … So I was afraid that would be handled poorly, [and] I was pleasantly surprised.”

Chandler Klang Smith on AdBuddy:

“It seems like it’s modeled on the way that if you don’t have a subscription to certain websites, then they’ll show you ads, but you can also pay to have those ads removed. It’s that kind of idea carrying over into meatspace. Someone with a briefcase full of ads will follow you around and talk through ads at you. If you can’t pay for basically any product in a store, you can pay for it with an AdBuddy instead. … So there’s this idea that what we have in our world as an online surveillance and ad culture has been translated into external space, has been literalized, in this really interesting way. I thought that was such a smart idea, a way of commenting on something technological in our own culture but making it visible to us in a new way.”

David Barr Kirtley on the Statue of Extra Liberty:

“I don’t think I would have known this from watching the show, but apparently in this world there’s still the Statue of Liberty, and then looking in a different direction they’ve built another one, the Statue of Extra Liberty—because one Statue of Liberty isn’t enough. In interviews I read they didn’t really explain what the thinking was behind that. The way I read it was that this is such a consumerist world, and there’s so much rhetoric conflating personal freedom with a lack of regulations, that maybe part of the ethos of this world—part of the reason consumerism is so rampant—is because it’s been associated with personal liberty in this really overt way.”


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The Lost Dream Of Route 66

In the early and middle years of the 20th Century, America’s path westward was Route 66 — Chicago to L.A., a 2400-mile adventure to better times.  Later on, in the first years of the 21st Century, Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer Edward Keating traveled every mile of Route 66 five times over, and he documented that times had changed.  “The landscape that seemed ravaged; people on the margins, enduring life not living life,” as he describes it.  Eigthy-four of those photographs make up his new book, Main Street: The Lost Dream Of Route 66.

When those explorations of Route 66 began in 2000 with an assignment for The New York Times, “I had no preconceived ideas of what I was going to run into,” says Keating.  “I tried to keep my mind wide open.  But it didn’t take long to realize what needed to be done with this project.  A good photograph is one that tells the truth.”

“In photography, you’re stuck in the present, but you’re trying to evoke things from the past, anything that would refer to an earlier time, a better time,” says Keating in this more complete version of the interview.  “One of my favorite pictures is the Pegasus, the Mobil sign that’s been removed.  It’s only half there, a reverse stencil.  One of the remnants, the ghosts that are left behind.”

 

This ‘naked’ gay chef just landed his dream job… with Michelle Obama / LGBTQ Nation

bearnakedchef.com/publicity photo

The Bear-Naked Chef announced that he’s going on tour… with Michelle Obama.

Obama is planning a 12-city tour over the next month to promote her new book, Becoming, memoirs on her time at the White House.

On Instagram, Adrian de Berardinis, better known as the Bear-Naked Chef, took a break from cooking naked to announce that he would be going on the tour with her and cooking for the former First Lady and her guests.

“This has to be the most thrilling and incredible honor,” he wrote. “This has to be the greatest privilege… of my entire life, really. I’m over the moon!”

The tour started in Chicago this week and now heads to Los Angeles. It will end in December in New York City.

Investors See Nonmaterial Goals as Key to American Dream

Story Highlights

  • Seventy-four percent say equality of opportunity is an essential part
  • Majorities say five of 10 possible aspects of American dream are essential
  • Least essential: having a better lifestyle than parents

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Almost three-fourths of U.S. investors (74%) say equality of opportunity is an “essential” part of the American dream — the highest percentage among 10 tested aspects of the dream. Overall, investors consider nonmaterial goals such as having a good education (63%) or achieving one’s full potential (58%) as more essential to the American dream than material goals such as having a better standard of living than one’s parents (26%) or achieving financial success (46%).

Defining What Is Essential to the American Dream

“How important is each of the following to your idea of the American dream? Is it essential, important but not essential, or not important?”

Essential Important, but not essential Not important
% % %
Having equality of opportunity 74 23 3
Having a good education 63 33 4
Achieving your full potential 58 40 2
Making a positive difference in the world 57 37 6
Owning your own home 55 38 7
Having a job you love 47 48 5
Achieving financial success 46 49 5
Raising children 42 37 21
Getting married 30 44 26
Having a better standard of living than your parents 26 56 18
WELLS FARGO/GALLUP, AUG. 13-20, 2018

The third-quarter Wells Fargo/Gallup Investor and Retirement Optimism Index survey, conducted Aug. 13-20, measured the importance investors place on 10 aspects of the American dream, drawn from a broad spectrum of perspectives. Gallup and Wells Fargo define U.S. investors as adults with $10,000 or more invested in stocks, bonds or mutual funds, either within or outside of a retirement savings account.

All 10 goals measured are deemed by most investors as either essential or important to their idea of the American dream, but majorities value just five at the highest level — as essential. The 10 possible dream components fall into four types of goals:

  • Nonmaterial personal goals: Three nonmaterial goals tested in the survey are among the most likely to be considered essential: “having a good education,” “achieving your full potential” and “making a positive difference in the world.” The other nonmaterial goal — “having a job you love” — is essential to slightly less than a majority (47%).

  • Material goals: Among three material personal goals measured — “owning your own home,” “achieving financial success” and “having a better standard of living than your parents” — only homeownership is deemed essential by a majority (55%).

  • Lifestyle arrangements: The two lifestyle choices included on the list — getting married and raising children — do not receive majority “essential” mentions, and they are the two components most often listed as “not important” — 26% for getting married and 21% for raising children.

  • Societal value: The component most often mentioned as essential is the only one that is an aspiration for American society rather than the individual — “having equality of opportunity.” That goal, which echoes the Declaration of Independence’s “all men are created equal” and Martin Luther King’s “I Have a Dream” speech, has resonated with Americans across decades of polls testing it as both a national and a personal moral code.

Young Investors More Likely to List American Dream Possibilities as Essential

Investors under the age of 50 are more likely than those 65 and older, by a margin of at least 10 percentage points, to list four personal goals as essential to their concept of the American dream. Two of these are nonmaterial (achieving your full potential and making a positive difference in the world) and two are material (achieving financial success and owning your own home).

Younger Investors Lead the Way in Labeling Dream Goals Essential

Percentage of U.S. investors, by age, who consider each of the following “essential” to their idea of the American dream

18-49 50-64 65+ Difference between 18-49 and 65+
% % % pct. pts.
Achieving financial success 50 44 38 +12
Achieving your full potential 62 56 51 +11
Making a positive difference in the world 61 54 51 +10
Owning your own home 56 60 46 +10
Having a better standard of living than your parents 28 25 22 +6
Having equality of opportunity 75 72 74 +1
Raising children 42 42 41 +1
Getting married 29 33 28 +1
Having a good education 64 57 67 -3
Having a job you love 45 48 50 -5
WELLS FARGO/GALLUP, AUG. 13-20, 2018

Investors aged 50-64 are slightly more likely than the other two age groups to list owning a home (60%) and getting married (33%) as essential.

Over Half of Investors Have Achieved American Dream Themselves

More than half (55%) of investors believe they have achieved what they consider to be the American dream. Over a third (36%) expect to achieve it someday, and 10% don’t expect to achieve it.

For investors 65 and older, more than six out of seven (87%) believe they have achieved their version of the American dream — significantly more than for investors 50-64 (59%) or younger than 50 (39%). But the vast majority in each of these last two age groups say they have achieved it or expect to do so someday — 91% of those 50-64 and 89% of those younger than 50.

Bottom Line

When James Truslow Adams first coined the phrase “The American dream” in his 1931 book “The Epic of America,” he downplayed the material aspects, instead describing it as “a dream of social order in which each man and each woman shall be able to attain to the fullest stature of which they are innately capable, and be recognized by others for what they are, regardless of the fortuitous circumstances of birth or position.”

Almost 90 years later, American investors seem to agree with those priorities for what constitutes the American dream, tending to find nonmaterial goals more essential than material ones to their personal vision of achieving the dream.

Learn more about how the Wells Fargo/Gallup Investor and Retirement Optimism Index works.

Gallup

Sharjah International Book Fair 2018 Celebrates Reading and Culture with 2.23 Million Visitors

SHARJAH, United Arab Emirates–(BUSINESS WIRE)–Nov 13, 2018–The world’s third largest celebration of the written word, the Sharjah International Book Fair (SIBF), has put up yet another record performance in its 37th annual edition. Themed ‘A Tale of Letters’, the event was a dream come true occasion for book lovers, who had access to 20 million books, all under one roof.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20181113006044/en/

Sharjah International Book Fair 2018 – Provided by Sharjah Book Authority (Photo: Business Wire)

Organised by the Sharjah Book Authority (SBA) in the emirate of Sharjah, cultural capital of the United Arab Emirates (UAE), SIBF 2018 witnessed a footfall of 2.23 million visitors in 11 days, including 230,000 school students who poured in from around the country.

The Sharjah International Book Fair hosted 1,874 publishers from 77 countries who brought in 1.6 million titles, 80,000 of which were seen at the fair for the first time. It also offered its stage to 1,800 events spanning celebrity author talks, seminars, book signings, poetry and storytelling, theatre, arts, entertainment and much more.

These activities generated unrivalled social media traction, receiving a whopping 2.7 billion impressions. The SIBF hashtag #SIBF18 reached 300 million users via 70,000 posts on its official social media accounts.

The SIBF Guest of Honour programme, which seeks to build cultural bridges between the UAE and the world, had Japan under the spotlight this year.

This year, the fair saw the fifth edition of the annual SIBF/ALA Library Conference organised in partnership between the Sharjah Book Authority and the American Library Association (ALA). The conference was attended by over 400 librarians and academics from the region and the world, who partook in over 25 panel discussions and networking events, to discuss the changing role of libraries in the era of digitisation.

The three-day SIBF Publishers Conference, which is held as a precursor to the 11-day event, engaged 486 publishers with panel discussions, and 3,000 “Matchmaking Meetings”. These meetings resulted in the signing of 2,884 translation rights agreements.

View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20181113006044/en/

CONTACT: National Network Communications (NNC)

Fadia Daouk, +971 52 617 2111

KEYWORD: UNITED ARAB EMIRATES MIDDLE EAST

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: WOMEN EDUCATION UNIVERSITY ENTERTAINMENT PHILANTHROPY TEENS BOOKS OTHER PHILANTHROPY CONSUMER MEN

SOURCE: Sharjah

Copyright Business Wire 2018.

PUB: 11/13/2018 01:17 PM/DISC: 11/13/2018 01:17 PM

http://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20181113006044/en

New reads for fall (New books for fall reading) — High Country News

Enjoy a sampling of the season’s best new books.

 

Here at High Country News, we’ve combed through hundreds of titles relevant to the West, mostly from indie presses and other small publishers, to bring you a sampling of the season’s best new reads. Listings appear alphabetically by author; if a book is already available, no publication month is given. —Jodi Peterson

FICTION

Buddhism for Western Children Kirstin Allio, University of Iowa Press

Chupacabra Meets Billy the Kid Rudolfo Anaya, University of Oklahoma Press

Nevada Days Bernardo Atxaga, Graywolf

Evening in Paradise: More Stories Lucia Berlin, Farrar, Straus & Giroux

Ruby Dreams of Janis Joplin: A Novel Mary Clearman Blew, University of Nebraska Press

The Best Bad Things: A Novel Katrina Carrasco, MCD

Perpetua’s Kin: A Novel M. Allen Cunningham, Atelier26

Rough Animals Rae DelBianco, Arcade

Heartbreaker: A Novel Claudia Dey, Random House

The Sea of Grass Walter Echo-Hawk, Fulcrum Publishing

Crossing Vines: A Novel Rigoberto González, University of Oklahoma Press

Trinity Louisa Hall, Ecco

Mostly White: A Novel Alison Hart,
Torrey House Press

Trouble No Man Brian Hart, HarperPerennial, January 2019

A River of Stars Vanessa Hua, Ballantine

The Golden State Lydia Kiesling, MCD

Immigrant, Montana Amitava Kumar, Knopf

Driving to Geronimo’s Grave and Other Stories Joe R. Lansdale, Subterranean

The Feral Detective: A Novel Jonathan Lethem, Ecco

Lost Children Archive: A Novel Valeria Luiselli, Random House, February 2019

Son of Amity Peter Nathaniel Malae, Oregon State University

Wolves of Eden Kevin McCarthy, Norton

The Frame-Up Meghan Scott Molin, 47North

Gateway to the Moon Mary Morris, Doubleday/Talese

The Caregiver Samuel Park, Simon & Schuster

The Shortest Way Home Miriam Parker, Dutton

Hearts of the Missing Carol Potenza, Minotaur, December

Magdalena Mountain Robert Michael Pyle, Counterpoint

The Silence is the Noise Bart Schaneman, Trident Press

All That Is Left Is All That Matters Mark Slouka, W.W. Norton & Company

Don’t Send Flowers Martín Solares, Black Cat

The Removes Tatjana Soli, FSG/Crichton

The Electric State Simon Stålenhag, Skybound

Every Other Weekend Zulema Renee Summerfield, Little, Brown

Static Flux Natasha Young, Metatron Press

Family Trust: A Novel Kathy Wang, William Morrow

Whiskey When We’re Dry John Larison, Viking

NONFICTION, BIOGRAPHY, MEMOIR, ESSAYS

One Size Fits None: A Farm Girl’s Search for the Promise of Regenerative Agriculture Stephanie Anderson, University of Nebraska Press

How the West Was Drawn: Mapping, Indians and the Construction of the Trans-Mississippi West David Bernstein, University of Nebraska Press

Vaquita: Science, Politics and Crime in the Sea of Cortez Brooke Bessesen, Island Press

The Last Cowboys: A Pioneer Family in the New West John Branch,
W.W. Norton & Company

Polly Pry: The Woman Who Wrote the West Julia Bricklin, Globe Pequot Press/ TwoDot

Utah Politics and Government Adam R. Brown, University of Nebraska Press

Dirt to Soil: One Family’s Journey into Regenerative Agriculture Gabe Brown with Courtney White, Chelsea Green

Confessions of an Iyeska Viola Burnette, University of Utah Press

Outside Ourselves: Landscape and Meaning in the Greater Yellowstone Todd Burritt, Outside Ourselves

All You Can Ever Know Nicole Chung, Catapult

In Defense of Loose Translations: An Indian Life in an Academic World Elizabeth Cook-Lynn, University of Nebraska Press

Homelands: Four Friends, Two Countries, and the Fate of the Great Mexican-American Migration Alfredo Corchado, Bloomsbury

Across the Continent: The Union Pacific Photographs of Andrew J. Russell Daniel Davis, University of Utah Press

In Defense of Public Lands: The Case Against Privatization and Transfer Steven Davis, Temple University Press

Stigma Cities: The Reputation and History of Birmingham, San Francisco and Las Vegas Jonathan Foster, University of Oklahoma Press

Northland: A 4,000-Mile Journey Along America’s Forgotten Border Porter Fox, W.W. Norton & Company

A Dream Called Home Reyna Grande, Atria

The Woolly West: Colorado’s Hidden History of Sheepscapes Andrew Gulliford, Texas A&M University Press

Border Walk Mark J. Hainds, Sweetbill’s Enterprises

Deep Creek: Finding Hope in the High Country Pam Houston, Norton, January 2019

Being and Becoming Ute: The Story of an American Indian People Sondra G. Jones, University of Utah Press, January

Wild Migrations: Atlas of Wyoming’s Ungulates Matthew J. Kauffman et al., foreword by Annie Proulx, Oregon State University

Dear Los Angeles: The City in Diaries and Letters, 1542 to 2018 David Kipen, Modern Library, December

Campfire Stories: Tales from America’s National Parks ed. Dave and Ilyssa Kyu, Mountaineers

The Oasis This Time: Living and Dying with Water in the West Rebecca Lawton, Torrey House Press, March 2019

A Study of Southwestern Archaeology Stephen H. Lekson, University of Utah Press

Debunking Creation Myths about America’s Public Lands John D. Leshy, University of Utah Press

It Happened Like This: A Life in Alaska Adrienne Lindholm, Mountaineers

The Salt Lake Papers: From the Years in the Earthscapes of Utah Edward Lueders, University of Utah Press

Stray: A Memoir of a Runaway Tanya Marquardt, Little A

Reimaging a Place for the Wild edited by Leslie Miller and Louise Excell, University of Utah Press, December

Caribou Rainforest: From Heartbreak to Hope David Moskowitz, Braided River

Food from the Radical Center: Healing our Land and Communities Gary Nabhan, Island Press

The Dreamer and the Doctor Jack Nisbet, Sasquatch Books

The Library Book Susan Orlean, Simon & Schuster

The Browns of California: The Family Dynasty That Transformed a State and Shaped a Nation Miriam Pawel, Bloomsbury

Impossible Owls: Essays Brian Phillips, FSG Originals

Gay Rights and the Mormon Church: Intended Actions, Unintended Consequences Gregory A. Prince, University of Utah Press, February

Here and There: A Fire Survey Stephen J. Pyne, University of Arizona Press

The Spoils of Dust: Reinventing the Lake that Made Los Angeles Alexander Robinson, Applied Research + Design Publishing

Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore Elizabeth Rush, Milkweed

On Call in the Arctic: A Doctor’s Pursuit of Life, Love and Miracles in the Alaskan Frontier Thomas J. Sims, Pegasus

Heartland: A Memoir of Working Hard and Being Broke in the Richest Country on Earth Sarah Smarsh, Scribner

Retablos: Stories from a Life Lived Along the Border Octavio Solis, City Lights

Frontier Rebels: The Fight for Independence in the American West, 1765-1776 Patrick Spero, W.W. Norton & Company

The Sun is a Compass: A 4,000-Mile Journey into the Alaskan Wilds Caroline Van Hemert, Little, Brown Spark

Sagebrush Collaboration: How Harney County Defeated the Takeover of the Malheur Wildlife Refuge Peter Walker, Oregon State University Press

Raw Material: Working Wool in the West Stephany Wilkes, Oregon State University

Path of the Puma: The Remarkable Resilience of the Mountain Lion Jim Williams, Patagonia

The Three-Minute Outdoorsman Returns: From Mammoth on the Menu to the Benefits of Moose Drool Robert M. Zink, University of Nebraska Press  


15-year-old Dubai student authors ‘inspiring’ book

Aryan launched his second book ‘Tales of Realisation’ at the Sharjah International Book Fair (SIBF) 2018 on Friday, November 9.

Everyone has a novelist inside them, but it’s only a few gifted ones who realise and bring it out – this is what Aryan Muralidharan, a fifteen-year-old author from The Millennium School, Dubai, said about how he feels being a teen author.

Aryan launched his second book ‘Tales of Realisation’ at the Sharjah International Book Fair (SIBF) 2018 on Friday, November 9. The book is a collection of inspiring short stories. “I want this book to serve as an inspiration for my friends so they can reach greater heights in life and become better human beings. My first book aimed to instill values such as honesty, integrity etc. among children,” he said.

The teenager debuted as an author during the last year’s SIBF with his book ‘A Tryst with Life’ – a compilation of inspiring short stories, mostly real-life incidents.

“I believe that life itself is a great inspiration. Every incident which I come across or experience has proved to be an inspiration for me as I learned various important lessons. I would like to thank my parents, grandparents and teachers for setting a great example and inspiring me at every stage of my life.”

Aryan writes non-fictional stories which are based on real-life incidents. “I believe that a good story should not be monotonous but inspire the readers to reach greater heights in life. Therefore, my stories are based on incidents which can serve as an eye-opener to the reader. I have also inscribed my musings in the form of stories as I believe that books can create a positive impact in the society.”

His second book ‘Tales of Realisation’ was launched at the Writer’s Forum at SIBF and was attended by over 60 guests and dignitaries. The chief guests were his school principal Ambika Gulati and Mohan Kumar, foreign sections and external affairs coordinator at the Sharjah Book Authority.

“Writing is my greatest passion and I want to use the power of my pen to create a positive impact in the society and change the world for better. I want to write more of inspirational stories in the future to inspire my friends to burn the midnight oil in pursuit of success and happiness.”

Lover of letters

Aryan started writing from the age of seven when he was studying in Grade 1. “I was presented with my first book by my then class teacher, and I fell in love with the amazing world of letters. I started writing stories whenever I got an idea or found an interesting topic. Soon, I had a large collection of short stories and had participated in various creative writing contests.”

There was some sort of fascination that Aryan found with seeing his name printed on a book as an author and this led him to nurture a dream to author his own book.

As time passed, Aryan gradually developed a passion to share his ideas with the world. “It was while idling away during my summer holidays, that my parents suggested the idea of compiling the stories. And soon I saw my dream convert into a reality last year.”

Apart from being an author, the Grade 9 student is also a recipient of Sheikh Hamdan Award for Distinguished Academic Performance that is given to students who excel in both academics and co-curricular activities. He has also received the International Diana Award, given to students for their extraordinary contribution towards the society.

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‘Fixer Upper’ Star Joanna Gaines’s ‘Homebody’ Design Book Is A Dream Turned Reality

For four years, fans watched as Joanna Gaines brought homeowners’ interior imaginations come true with her exquisite designs on the HGTV series Fixer Upper, which she starred on along with her husband, home renovation expert Chip Gaines. Long before that, Joanna Gaines helped people fill the spaces of their dreams with the home goods sold in her store, Little Shop on Bosque, in Waco, Texas, which essentially served as the brainchild of the couple’s business, Magnolia Homes.

Although the Gaines role on Fixer Upper officially came to an end with the series finale in April, the sad ending of one chapter became the exciting beginning of a new for Joanna Gaines, including a manifestation of her own goals—finally publishing a home design book.

Joanna Gaines' 'HOMEBODY' Design Book Is a Dream Turned Reality Joanna Gaines appears on the cover of her new home design book, “HOMEBODY: A Guide to Creating Spaces You Never Want to Leave. Courtesy of Magnolia/Harper Design

HOMEBODY: A Guide to Creating Spaces You Never Want to Leave, Gaines’ first home design book apart from her husband, is more than just a testament of the wealth of knowledge she’s gained in the many years she’s served as an interior designer. It’s her very own dream turned reality.

“When I first opened my shop in 2003, I told Chip I wanted to write a design book one day,” Joanna Gaines told Newsweek during her book launch on Tuesday. “I had a little red journal and he said, ‘Take that out and write down every time you learn a lesson from one of your customers as you’re helping them in their homes, and one day write it all out.’ So I feel like this is something I’ve been writing for a long time.”

Joanna Gaines' 'HOMEBODY' Design Book Is a Dream Turned Reality This grand entrance, designed by Joanna Gaines, reflects a traditional style with modern and rustic accents. Lisa Petrole

Through the book, self-proclaimed homebody Joanna Gaines is doing much of what she does best— helping folks bring beauty and comfort to their homes, except this time around she’s lending her expertise to encourage homeowners to identify and develop their own unique and personal design style.

“I wanted to help people articulate the story they’re trying to tell with their homes and show them they don’t have to be intimidated by the idea of design. [They can] actually have fun with it. Home is the most important place on Earth. It’s important that we invest in our spaces,” she said.

HOMEBODY offers Joanna Gaines’ insight for turning any area into one worth living in, from the standard bedrooms, bathrooms and kitchens to kid’s spaces, entryways and retreat rooms. The book is also sprinkled with stories of Joanna Gaines’ own personal experiences with home design, like how an “unrelenting sweet tooth” and a cake stand wedding gift not only sparked a deeper appreciation for cooking within her but also inspired her to turn her average first-home kitchen into a space that made visitors feel welcome.

Joanna Gaines 'HOMEBODY' Design Book Is a Dream Turned Reality An updated take on a vintage kitchen, designed by Joanna Gaines. (Photo: Lisa Petrole

“This has been such a journey of learning for myself, all the trails and errors and moments of not letting some failures be the very thing that made me not want to design again. I think it was important that people saw how I did it in my own life and why I’m so passionate about it. Hopefully, other people can resonate with that and be encouraged to try it themselves in their own home,” the mother-of-four said. “Designer or not designer, that’s not the point”

Ani DiFranco Details New Memoir ‘No Walls And The Recurring Dream’

In January 2017, Ani DiFranco announced that she would be penning her memoir. Nearly two years later, the singer-songwriter has revealed the book will be titled No Walls And The Recurring Dream and is set for release via Viking Books on May 7.

DiFranco’s memoir details her early life and nearly 30-year career in music, which includes her championing of both feminism and political activism. “Ani’s coming of age story is defined by her ethos of fierce independence — from being an emancipated minor sleeping in a Buffalo bus station, to unwaveringly building a career through appearances at small clubs and festivals, to releasing her first album at the age of 18, to consciously rejecting the mainstream recording industry and creating her own label, Righteous Babe Records,” her publisher shared about the tome.

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